All posts tagged: improvement

What Winnie the Pooh Can Teach Us About Improving Recruiting Performance

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Improvement ideas for recruiting and hiring can often come from surprising sources. One such source is Winnie the Pooh.

The staying power of Pooh and friends isn’t just because they’re adorable. They’re relatable. Each character is emblematic of the types of people drawn to recruiting and staffing.

So imagine if you will these characters as part of a recruiting team. How could each improve their performance? Which of these ideas applies to you?

Winnie the Pooh
Does he really lack smarts?

On several occasions, Pooh refers to himself as a “bear of little brain.” I can imagine Pooh as a recruiter saying things like, “Oh bother, I just don’t have the brains to learn all of this jargon” or “I was not made to make so many calls. I get started and end up all muddled and confused.”

Does Pooh really have little or no brains? Let’s look at some of his assets. He is loving, loyal, a great friend, and ends up on top even through all of the bumbling because he always tries to do the right thing.

One of the biggest obstacles Pooh needs to overcome is his tendency to bury his head in a big pot of honey when things aren’t going well. If a hire starts falling apart, Pooh’s immediate reaction would be to immerse himself in finding a “smackeral” or two of the sweet stuff.

Here are some constructive alternatives to help Pooh (and you Pooh-like recruiters out there) deal with confusion, disorganization, and those times when things start going awry:

  1. First and foremost, he needs to get organized. A great way to start is by writing out his plan for tomorrow the day before.
  2. His confusion may indicate a need for additional training and practice. Just like the real world, the 100 Acre Woods offers many options including workshops, books, and articles.
  3. Pooh needs to identify his destructive patterns, such as overeating or burying his head in a pot of honey. Then, he can replace them with a positive and constructive alternative. For instance, when something goes wrong, Pooh first needs to consider the options. Is there something he can do or is it best to let it go and move on to something else? Sometimes the best option is to let go of a situation, especially if you have done everything within your power to remedy the problem.
  4. Like many of us in recruiting and staffing, Pooh has great colleagues and friends to turn to for advice and support. In addition to their suggestions and insights, role-plays and practice sessions can help him to improve his skills and discover ways to enhance his recruiting abilities.

Tigger
Focusing all of that bounciness and energy.

Tigger lacks focus. What he does have are bundles of energy and a positive nature that will carry him far. But his inability to harness that energy in a focused manner trips him up. Tigger also needs to be completely honest with himself. He tends to be so positive that he doesn’t recognize when he needs to regroup and isn’t aware that things may not going as well as he thinks.

Some tips for Tigger:

  1. A daily action plan would be a great tool for Tigger, just as it is for Pooh (in fact, I have yet to meet anyone who would not benefit from a daily plan). To stay focused in the moment, the more detailed this plan, the better. If Tigger could focus completely on one task before moving to another, the quality of his work would improve almost immediately.
  2. A strong dose of reality from time to time would do Tigger a lot of good. Bouncing ideas off colleagues, asking for honest feedback from co-workers, and occasionally taking a few moments to assess his own progress would give him clarity about where he is and the next step to take.

Eeyore
Could he be a lost cause?

Things just never seem to go Eeyore’s way. Whether it is falling into a briar patch or losing his tail (again), he seems to find himself in one unpleasant situation after another.

Eeyore reminds me of people I have met in my life that I call the “doom and gloomers.” They believe that bad things are going to happen and inevitably create a self-fulfilling prophecy.

Most of us are not at this extreme, but ask yourself, “Am I, like Eeyore, sabotaging myself with negative thoughts?”

Ideas for Eeyore:

  1. It’s hard to think your way into new behavior. But you can act your way into a new way of thinking. The key is action. Eeyore needs to have a pre-planned list of actions he can take the moment gloom starts to kick in. Immediately getting into action will him feel better about himself instead of spiraling further and further into self-defeating thoughts.
  2. Negativity breeds negativity. Eeyore needs to look for and remove the negative people, situations, and possible stressors that are around him. By surrounding himself with positive things and people, it will become very natural for him to rise to the level of those around him.

Rabbit
All of those carrots gave him an eye for too many details.

Rabbit takes playing by the rules to an extreme. Can you see him ever coloring outside the lines? Rabbit’s organization skills and intelligence are fantastic, yet they sometimes cause problems because he can’t think outside the box. Rabbit could greatly benefit from lightening up and having more fun.

Here are some tips for Rabbit:

  1. Rabbit needs to play (all work and no play make Rabbit a dull and stodgy furry critter). He overwhelms himself with responsibility. Rabbit needs to find something that brings out his playful nature such as swinging on playground equipment, playing in a sandbox, driving go-karts, or anything that is all about having fun.
  2. Just say “no” to the need to be perfect. The best thing Rabbit can do for himself is to accept and be okay with the fact that he is not perfect and mistakes will happen. This is not only okay; it is a part of life!

Piglet
Mustering the courage to be a great recruiter.

Wouldn’t it have been great if Piglet could have gone to Oz with Dorothy and gotten some courage? One of Piglet’s biggest stumbling blocks is his lack of confidence when communicating with others.

On the plus side, he is extremely honest. What a salesman of job opportunities or candidates he could be if he were to combine his honesty with a strong dose of self-confidence.

Here are some tips for Piglet to build a reserve of confidence in himself:

  1. Practice the tried and true “act as if” principle. If he practices being confident he will eventually act his way into a confident way of thinking.
  2. Journaling is a powerful tool for uncovering what is really going on. If Piglet spends time each day journaling in detail his thoughts and feelings, there is a good chance that he will uncover the source of his self-doubt.

Do you see yourself in Pooh, Tigger, Eeyore, Rabbit, or Piglet? Just like the recruiters of Honey Pot recruiting team, you have a choice to stay where you are or grow into your potential. Looking beyond what you do to who you are will give you insight into the changes and improvements necessary to increase your success in recruiting.

Scott WintripWhat Winnie the Pooh Can Teach Us About Improving Recruiting Performance
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An Unexpected Way to Improve Your Recruiting and Hiring Process

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Process improvement is an important leadership responsibility. This episode features a method for improving your recruiting and hiring process…a method many leaders haven’t yet considered.

Scott WintripAn Unexpected Way to Improve Your Recruiting and Hiring Process
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If You Want to Improve Results Adopt this Business Practice

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A top task for most leaders is to generate results. These could include increasing revenue, improving retention on your team, growing market share, filling jobs faster, or one of many other measurable outcomes that demonstrate you’re during your job. In this episode, I share a simple way to increase the likelihood that you’ll achieve the desired results.

Scott WintripIf You Want to Improve Results Adopt this Business Practice
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Four Leadership Must Practices

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Best Practices are brilliant; Innovative Practices are absolutely magnificent. Must Practices, which not as glitzy, sexy, or exciting, are non-negotiable ways of doing leadership and being a great leader that are a requirement for success. Here are four crucial Must Practices:

Today’s leaders must…

1. …foster sustainable collaboration.
There’s always room and need for improvement in the collaborative efforts of work groups and teams. To make this happen, leaders must prime the collaborative pump. Read more

2. …require direct reports to create and follow sustainable action plans.
Defining how results will be achieved is often the missing step that keeps them from happening. Sustainable action plans aren’t hard to create, there’re just not being created and followed. Read more

3. …push the leadership reset button.
Our human nature is one of perfect imperfection, which means our brains occasionally need a reset or even a reboot to reengage our effectiveness. Leadership Power Cycling is the human equivalent of a computer reset button. Read more

4. …lose their own baggage.
While losing your baggage is a hassle when flying it can be a transformational catalyst for evolving two things very near and dear to you—your business and your life. Read more

Scott WintripFour Leadership Must Practices
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Why You Should Take Things Personally

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We’re often told not to take things personally, yet, there are times when briefly doing so serves us well. Take, for example, when you learn that a current client bought from someone else. Most likely, that means the customer did not tell you or, more often than not, that you did not ask how else you could be of service. In this instance, one of your competitors got a check that should have been made out to your company.

It’s moments like this that I recommend you take just a few moments and take this very, very personally. You missed out! Somewhere, somehow, the follow-through, process, or value was not sufficient enough to engage that customer in spending more money.

The questions to ask, when this happens, are:

1. What did I miss this? And how did I miss it?
2. And how do keep this from happening again?

Mistakes are valuable as long as they are made only once as the lessons from them are instilled as permanent change.

Join me for a special TeleClass: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Balance

Scott WintripWhy You Should Take Things Personally
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When the Student is Ready, the Teacher is Already There

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Resistance to change is as common and universal as the desire to be loved. Humans are creatures of habit, often perpetuating choices that are not as healthy or productive as other available options. From food to work styles to prioritization, there are frequently better ways to do the things we do.

Herein lies the problem – you most likely don’t have the time, energy, or even the interest to change or improve every aspect of your work and life. Nor should you. Better does not always mean worth it. Some changes, while technically an improvement, are so negligible that there is very little return on the investment of the time spent to achieve that better state.

So, how do you know when striving for betterment is worth the effort? Just watch for the red lights. It’s similar to having picked the wrong road in town on your way to an important meeting. You know you’ve not chosen the best route when every block or two you get stopped as the light turns red. When you arrive late for your meeting, you vow to pick a different way to go next time to avoid the struggle.

Struggles in work and personal life are much like those persistent red lights; they’re telling you to go a different way. Like a wise teacher just waiting to show you a simpler solution, a pattern of obstacles or challenges is your indicator that an opportunity exists to do things in a more effective manner. Your task is to learn what the current circumstances can teach you and what other options are available to achieve the results you desire. You’ll know when you’ve picked the simpler, easier way as you sail through your own version of green light after green light on the path you are traveling.

Scott WintripWhen the Student is Ready, the Teacher is Already There
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