All posts tagged: Recruitment

Stewart Samkange–Hiring Hero of the Week

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Meet Stewart Samkange, this week’s Hero of Hiring. His stated mission is to “make the ‘working-world’ a better place.” Stewart is doing that through his work with LinkedIn (he provides talent solutions for Africa to help HR Directors plan, develop, and hire) and his thought leadership. What makes Stewart a powerful presence for change and improvement is what he shares with the world, how he shares it, and the conversations he’s able to create. When you scroll through the content he posts you’ll see what I mean (click here for an example). Stewart says that one of his secrets of success is that he’s “bold, ambitious, and disarmingly honest.” Yes he is, and we could use more of that in our world. Thank you Stewart for being a role model and for the heroic work you do every day!

BTW…you can find the valuable content I referred to on Stewart’s LinkedIn page.

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ABOUT THE HEROES OF HIRING

We’ve all heard it said that a company’s most important asset is its people. When we say we love a company, what we’re really saying is we love the work being done by the exceptional people in these organizations. Talented employees who do outstanding work are the secret ingredients that make their companies great. That’s why recruiting and hiring is so important. Each person involved in the hiring process is influencing the future of their company. These individuals are also impacting one of the most important aspects of people’s lives—their careers. The individuals who play a role in the hiring process are changing companies and lives, making hiring a heroic act.

The hiring heroism of a select group of people goes above and beyond. These unsung hiring heroes are making a lasting difference on a grand scale. That’s the reason for this distinction—the Hiring Hero of the Week. The hope in bestowing this honor is that people across the globe can celebrate and learn from these truly amazing human beings.

Scott WintripStewart Samkange–Hiring Hero of the Week
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Want to Fill More Staffing Orders? Change This One Thing

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I’m frequently asked how staffing and recruitment providers can fill open job orders when there aren’t enough people to fill them. I answer that question in this episode and also provide specific details for firms of different sizes.

Scott WintripWant to Fill More Staffing Orders? Change This One Thing
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7 Avoidable Recruiting Mistakes

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A baking mishap reminded me of a common mistake in recruiting. The baker, my cousin, decided to take some liberties with a bread recipe. Instead of measuring the ingredients, she eyeballed it, adding generous portions of her favorites. Then she decided to knead the dough for half the amount of time called for in the recipe.

The result—a chewy gritty lump that tasted nothing like bread.

Baking is a science. Follow the recipe and you’ll get a positive result. The same is true in recruiting. There’s a science to getting a good result. Skip a step or fail to follow a proven process and you end up with lackluster candidates and unfilled jobs.

Yes, there’s an art to being good at recruiting, especially when it comes to the day to day aspects of the job, but that never outweighs the importance of the strategic ingredients required for success.

Here are seven frequent recruiting mistakes, and how you can avoid them.

Mistake #1
Drawing in too little or too much talent
This first mistake is the most common. Many companies aren’t drawing in enough quality candidates, blaming the skills shortage as the problem. Some organizations draw in too many people who are underqualified, typically as a result of an unhealthy reliance on automation. Both of these extremes make recruiting labor intensive and filling open jobs a challenge.

Generating a continuous supply of top talent requires leveraging all eight talent streams. Organizations that maximize all eight recruit faster, fill positions more efficiently, and effortlessly create pipelines of top talent for future openings.

Mistake #2
Having unrealistic hiring criteria
It’s common to throw everything but the kitchen sink into your hiring criteria. Making a quality hire is vital and starts with deciding who you’ll select. Unfortunately, the extreme importance of hiring right the first time has led leaders to be overly restrictive about who they’ll consider for a job. This limits the talent pool and keeps positions open for a long time.

There’s a simple way to create accurate hiring criteria—seek proof. Review all of the people who’ve succeeded in the role. Look for the patterns among their skills, experiences, and personality traits. Make those your hiring criteria and leave the kitchen sink where it belongs.

Mistake #3
Getting overly attached to one candidate
Falling in love isn’t just the plot line in romantic movies, it’s why the recruiting process in many companies becomes a drama. It often plays out like this…a superb candidate is found for the job, someone you fall in love with. “She’s the one,” you say.  As a result, the recruiting effort comes to a screeching halt. When it turns out she isn’t the one, a mad dash ensues as you scramble to find more candidates.

Instead of falling in love with people, it’s better to become enamored with a process that keeps talent flowing. Some organizations refer to that as practicing their ABC’s, as in Always Be Cultivating talented people even after you think you’ve found “the one.”

Mistake #4
Becoming too reliant upon one resource
Most recruiters have a preferred stream of talent. For many, it’s referrals. They see referrals as the gold standard of recruiting, believing that this is the best way to find high quality people.

While it’s true that referrals are gold, it’s just one of the eight streams of talent. Some of the streams provide overlapping access to the same candidates. However, no single stream can draw in all of the available quality people. That’s why it’s important to keep tapping into all eight.

Mistake #5
Waiting until a job opens to recruit
It’s not if there’s going to be a job opening, but when. That’s why the most successful organizations plan for the when.

How are these companies planning for the inevitable? They’re shifting from the old way of hiring (keeping a job open until the right person shows up) into the new way of hiring (lining up talented people and waiting for the right job to open). They start with one core role, filling currently open positions and cultivating talent for when that job opens again. Then they move on to the next role. And then the next. And then the next.

Mistake #6
Creating ads and posts that are boring
The majority of job listings read like typical ad copy. That’s why these posts fail to hold the interest of top talent. The mundane content creates a negative first impression, repelling quality candidates.

What kind of content captures and keeps attention? Details about how working in your organization has improved lives and careers is a great place to start. Combine that with eye-catching delivery methods, such as video, gifs, or infographics, and you’ll attract and keep the interest of top talent.

Mistake #7
Engaging in hiring insanity
Einstein has been quoted as saying that insanity is doing the same things over and over again and expecting a different result. By that definition, there’s quite a bit of insanity going on in recruiting. For instance, ask someone why they persist at an approach that isn’t drawing in enough quality talent, and you’re likely to hear, “because that’s how we’ve always done it.”

You can stop the insanity by regularly questioning each step of the recruiting process. Consider why it’s done that way. What results are being achieved? How can you could improve that result? In what ways you could streamline each step of the process?

My cousin threw out that gritty lump of so-called bread. The next batch was superb because she followed the recipe, avoiding her past mistakes. You can do the same when you’re recruiting. Eliminating these 7 preventable errors will allow you to source top people who will become superb new hires.

 

Scott Wintrip7 Avoidable Recruiting Mistakes
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Want Better Results From Your Applicant Tracking System? Here’s Some Expert Advice

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Concrete advice combined with some blunt commentary. That’s what you’ll hear in this conversation with Doug Coull, Founder and CEO of APS, the makers of SmartSearch. According to Doug, having a better ATS experience requires that staffing companies change their perspective on software selection. He also believes that the normal customer-vendor paradigm is ineffective and suggests a different approach. Plus he doesn’t hold back when he shares what he thinks is wrong with the software industry. Doug mentions a software selection guide in the podcast. You can request that here.

Scott WintripWant Better Results From Your Applicant Tracking System? Here’s Some Expert Advice
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Attract Quality Candidates by Thinking Like a Product Marketer

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Talented people are bombarded with opportunities. So many that yours could easily be lost in the crowd. There’s a simple way to make your opportunities stand out—package your jobs as if you’re marketing a product.

I was reminded of this method when I was in the tea aisle of Whole Foods Market. If you’ve never been in their tea aisle, it’s a plethora of color, size, and shape. It’s quite a sight…and a potential sales nightmare for individual suppliers.

Manufacturers have learned to compete in this cornucopia by packaging their tea in boxes, tins, and containers of all colors, sizes, and shapes to attract your attention.

There was a woman standing in the aisle gazing at the wall of tea. As I watched her consider her options, I noticed that she was scanning the shelves, occasionally picking up a box or tin, checking out the back and then either placing the item in her cart or putting it back on the shelf.

I watched a bit longer, curious about the system she had going. Eventually my curiosity won out and I approached her.

“Excuse me, I hope I’m not intruding. I was noticing how you were looking at tea. I’m a consultant. My clients are always interested in how people make choices. I noticed you’re very particular with what you’re looking for. May I ask why?”

“Well,” she started, “I’m bored with my current brand of tea. I’ve decided to try some new flavors and brands. Maybe there’s something better than what I was buying before.”

“Okay, and how are you going to pick?”

“Well, I like a robust tea so I’m looking for cues—pictures or words—on the front of the box that tell me it might be full-flavored.”

“Okay. I noticed that when one grabbed your attention, that’s when you picked it up and checked the back.”

“Right. The front of the box is what captures my attention. Then I look at the back to finalize my decision. Simple as that.”

Tea Lady reminded me that packaging matters. How something is packaged either grabs or repels our attention.

This is why good jobs are often overlooked. They’re poorly packaged.

To get the attention of top talent, you must think like a product marketer. Your packaging (ads, posts, and verbal communication) must quickly grab people’s attention. This is the “front of the box.” Only after you’ve gotten a candidate’s attention will the details matter (the “back of the box”).

Take these steps to improve how you package opportunities.

Step #1: Next time you’re in a retail establishment, notice how product marketers package their offerings. Note the colors they use, the pictures they choose, and how carefully and sparingly they use words on the front of the box.

Step #2: Imagine your jobs were in a store competing with other opportunities. Each job is in a box, waiting for top talent to come down the aisle.

Step #3: Design the “box” with the jobseeker in mind. What pictures, words, and colors can you use to grab people’s attention?

Step #4: Test out a few designs with internal staff or an external focus group.

What’s this look like in action? A tech company with great opportunities was drawing in a trickle of talent. Using these steps, they created colorful images and short videos (under 10 seconds) of current employees sharing brief soundbites about how working at the company has improved their lives. They used these same soundbites as the opening content for written postings and conversations with candidates. Today, the company draws in a strong steady flow of highly qualified people.

Your jobs are important. They’re a product as important as what your company provides to its customers. Package them so that they stand out and get the attention they deserve.

Scott WintripAttract Quality Candidates by Thinking Like a Product Marketer
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Your Jobs On Indeed Are About To Disappear. Here’s What You Can Do About It.

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If you work in a staffing or recruitment firm, your jobs won’t appear in Indeed’s organic search results after January 6, 2019. You can learn more about the reasons for this in a blog post from Indeed.

Not surprisingly, many people are in a panic. But not everyone. Some firms have unleashed a force greater than Indeed that gives them a steady flow of top talent. More talent than they can place in jobs and assignments. Read on to learn how to access this force.

HOW TO INCREASE THE FLOW OF TALENT

In movies, we’ve heard about the concept of “force.” Some films use this idea for protection, as in a force field that repels. Then there’s the force that’s like a special positive power, helping the good guys defeat the bad ones.

In recruiting, there’s also a positive type of force related to sourcing talent. It’s called candidate gravity.

Candidate gravity is the “pull” that your firm has on talent. This pull may be weak, drawing in an insufficient supply of candidates; inconsistent, coming in ebbs and flows; or strong, generating a consistent stream of people.

Staffing and recruitment firms with strong candidate gravity always draw a stronger flow of top talent their way, leaving second and third-tier candidates for everyone else.

Only 10 percent of firms across the globe maintain strong candidate gravity. They’re able to do this because they maximize all eight of the talent streams that generate candidate gravity; the other 90 percent do not.

If you want your company to have stronger candidate gravity, you must first identify where your pull on talent is weak and improve those areas of weakness. When you do, Indeed’s decision to remove you from their organic search results will be irrelevant.

Here are the eight talent streams.

Advertising
This includes print and online ads

Automation
Technology options include job boards, career sites, applicant tracking systems, tools for finding passive candidates, and more being added every year

Candidate Mining
You mine your digital and paper files of previous candidates, looking at them as prospective candidates and referral sources

Market Presence
Drawing in talent using your online and physical presence

Networking
Includes the virtual and physical worlds

Referrals
Still the most potent stream, referrals consistently point you to the right people for a job

Talent Manufacturing
Education and internships are used to create new talent

Talent Scouts
Creating talent sharing agreements with other staffing and recruitment firms, including competitors

Each talent stream gives you access to a different group of candidates. Some of the talent streams provide overlapping access to the same candidates, but no single stream can secure every qualified individual.

If your company is experiencing an inconsistent flow of qualified candidates, you’re likely not using all eight streams effectively. Also, if you’re getting much of your talent flow from Indeed, you’re over-relying on the automation stream. Improving your flow from the other seven streams will make the loss of Indeed a distant memory.

To more effectively leverage all eight talent streams, take these three steps.

Step #1: Determine which streams have a consistently strong flow (and those that do not).
A talent stream is serving you well when it generates a continuous flow of qualified candidates, some of whom regularly become good hires on jobs and assignments. Those talent streams that don’t produce qualified candidates aren’t yet being fully leveraged.

Step #2: Improve the flow of talent one stream at a time.
It’s tempting to improve the flow of each of your weak talent streams at the same time. However, rapid changes like that rarely stick. Instead, improve the flow one at a time. Add resources or upgrade your recruiting methods to make that happen. Then move on to the next talent stream, and then the next. Improving talent flow one stream at time is how the most successful firms generate a consistent and sustainable strong flow of talent.

Step #3: Maintain the flow of each talent stream.
Regularly monitor the flow of each stream individually. Is that stream still generating a flow of qualified candidates, some of whom regularly become good hires on jobs and assignments? If not, quickly address the issue by going back to step 2. When you’re effectively using all eight streams of talent, you’ll have a surplus of quality candidates.

No one talent source is the do all, end all. If you’ve been relying too heavily on Indeed this is your chance to change that. I hope you’ll get started on improving your candidate gravity today.

 

Scott WintripYour Jobs On Indeed Are About To Disappear. Here’s What You Can Do About It.
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Frustrated By Your ATS Experience? Here’s How You Can Change That

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It’s common to love tech when it works and despise it when it does not. This episode of my podcast is an open conversation about one specific type of tech: applicant tracking systems. In particular, what everyone involved with them can do better. This includes the software companies who make the systems and the buyers who use it. Whether you’re a buyer or vendor, you’ll take away concrete actions that will improve the ATS experience. Joining me for this conversation is Jonathan Novich, Vice President of Product Strategy for Bullhorn.

Scott WintripFrustrated By Your ATS Experience? Here’s How You Can Change That
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