All posts tagged: SHRM

Roy Maurer–Hiring Hero of the Week

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The valuable work of the Heroes of Hiring often has an immeasurable impact. That’s certainly true of this week’s Hero Roy Maurer. Roy covers talent acquisition for SHRM Online. He’s on the front lines of recruiting and hiring, bringing an expansive view and perspective to thousands of people across the globe. Because of Roy’s work, readers stay well informed and make better choices. From recent trends to legal considerations to best practices changes and more, Roy is helping those touched by his work seize opportunities, avoid pitfalls, and improve how they recruit, hire, and retain top talent. Thank you Roy for the heroic work you do every day!

P.S. Roy maintains an active presence on social media (not surprising). Follow him on Twitter and LinkedIn.

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ABOUT THE HEROES OF HIRING

We’ve all heard it said that a company’s most important asset is its people. When we say we love a company, what we’re really saying is we love the work being done by the exceptional people in these organizations. Talented employees who do outstanding work are the secret ingredients that make their companies great. That’s why recruiting and hiring is so important. Each person involved in the hiring process is influencing the future of their company. These individuals are also impacting one of the most important aspects of people’s lives—their careers. The individuals who play a role in the hiring process are changing companies and lives, making hiring a heroic act.

The hiring heroism of a select group of people goes above and beyond. These unsung hiring heroes are making a lasting difference on a grand scale. That’s the reason for this distinction—the Hiring Hero of the Week. The hope in bestowing this honor is that people across the globe can celebrate and learn from these truly amazing human beings.

Scott WintripRoy Maurer–Hiring Hero of the Week
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Steve Browne–Hiring Hero of the Week

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If we could clone a Hero of Hiring, Steve Browne would have to be at the top of the list. Steve is the Vice President of HR at LaRosa’s, Inc. What makes him worthy of being the Hiring Hero of the Week? Steve spends his days positively impacting those around him. When I get the chance to eat at a LaRosa’s pizzeria, I experience Steve’s influence in the quality of the people who work there (plus the pizza is amazing). Everywhere you look, be it online or at an HR event, Steve is there, supporting and guiding and cheering on the community. If that weren’t enough, he serves as a Director-at-Large on the SHRM Board of Directors and is the author of HR on Purpose: Developing Deliberate People Passion. Thank you Steve for the heroic work you do every day!

P.S. Steve is very active on social media. Follow him on Twitter and LinkedIn.

____________________________________

ABOUT THE HEROES OF HIRING

We’ve all heard it said that a company’s most important asset is its people. When we say we love a company, what we’re really saying is we love the work being done by the exceptional people in these organizations. Talented employees who do outstanding work are the secret ingredients that make their companies great. That’s why recruiting and hiring is so important. Each person involved in the hiring process is influencing the future of their company. These individuals are also impacting one of the most important aspects of people’s lives—their careers. The individuals who play a role in the hiring process are changing companies and lives, making hiring a heroic act.

The hiring heroism of a select group of people goes above and beyond. These unsung hiring heroes are making a lasting difference on a grand scale. That’s the reason for this distinction—the Hiring Hero of the Week. The hope in bestowing this honor is that people across the globe can celebrate and learn from these truly amazing human beings.

Scott WintripSteve Browne–Hiring Hero of the Week
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Blind Hiring May Be Missing the Point

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Roy Mauer from SHRM just wrote a great piece on so-called blind hiring techniques. Here’s a small “taste” and a link to the full piece:

Companies that want to increase the diversity of their workforce and eliminate intentional or unconscious bias from their recruiting process may try “blind hiring” techniques to help prevent discrimination when considering applicants. But experts disagree about the utility of this well-meaning practice, and stress that cultural fit remains the most important determinant for choosing whether to advance candidates.

Research shows recruiters and hiring managers tend to choose candidates with a similar demographic background as their own. They also are impressed by mention of a big-name former employer or alma mater, such as Google or Yale University—though association with well-known institutions is not necessarily indicative of job performance.

To counter these phenomena, so-called blind hiring techniques include:

  • Removing specific identifying information like the candidate’s name and educational background from applications and resumes, or eliminating the resume requirement altogether.
  • Assessing candidates based on skills testing or sample projects, then inviting the top performers in for interviews.
  • Conducting anonymous interviews, such as by using chat rooms and voice-masking technology.

According to recent media accounts, a smattering of companies and the U.K. government are experimenting with these approaches. San Mateo, Calif.-based cloud-storage firm Compose Inc. asks job applicants to write a short story about data, spend a day working on a mock project and complete an assignment. Deloitte’s U.K. arm announced in 2015 that it would begin asking for applications with candidates’ names and other identifying data redacted.

But while many people laud the intention behind these kinds of practices, not everyone is on board with the actual execution.

“These practices may be well-meaning, but they are not well-thought-out,” said Scott Wintrip, president of Wintrip Consulting Group, based in St. Petersburg, Fla. “Not only does front-loading assessments and testing turn off talent, especially top talent, it unnecessarily lengthens hiring processes that are already too long.”

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Scott WintripBlind Hiring May Be Missing the Point
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